Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 03 10:37

Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

I could watch this for hours...



Updated: Embedded Youtube stream

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Keyolder
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Apr 2021 03 13:25

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

I still don't understand how the earth's core is still molten after forming millions of years ago -Shock.png-
Maybe Jay can explain it a bit more? -Neutral.png-
I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it... -Crazy.png-
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inspector
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Apr 2021 03 15:21

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

Pressure. the result of Gravity.
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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 03 16:39

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

OK, I found an 'Ask a Scientist' question that asks: Which is hotter, the earth's core or the sun?. And the answer....

As you may know, the inside of the Earth is composed of several regions. The innermost region is the solid inner core, which is surrounded by the (liquid) molten outer core, and that is surrounded by the mantle. Finally, we have the crust, which is the outer shell that we live on. The closer to the middle of the Earth, the higher the temperature; so the core is the hottest part, and it only gets colder as you move outward towards the crust. There is no way to put a thermometer at the Earth’s core, but scientists have some pretty good ways to indirectly estimate the temperature. The best value we have today is that the temperature of the Earth’s core is between 5,700 to 6,700 K (about 11,000 ºF). This heat is actually left over from when the Earth formed over 4 billion years ago! It is leaving the Earth, but just taking a very long time to do so.

The Sun is a bit more complicated. The heat in the Sun is caused by nuclear fusion of the hydrogen it contains, which happens because of the extreme pressure and temperature at its centre, where the temperature is around 15,000,000 K (15 million K or 27 million ºF). Outside the center is the surface of the Sun, called the photosphere, which has a much cooler temperature of 5,500 K (10,000 ºF). Notice that the photosphere actually has a temperature quite close, or even a bit colder, than the Earth’s core! However, outside the photosphere there is the Sun’s corona, which can reach temperatures as high as 17,000,000 K; this is hotter than the centre of the Sun, and is the hottest place in the solar system! It is still a mystery why the outside of the Sun can be hotter than the middle, but many scientists are working very hard to try to find the answer. Perhaps someday you or one of your classmates will solve the puzzle.


https://eu.pressconnects.com/story/news ... /664573002

So that begs an answer to the puzzle... Why is the Sun's Corona hotter than the middle. Sounds like a 'Nobody Knows' question for QI -Big grin.png-

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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 03 17:03

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

Keyolder wrote: Sat, 3rd Apr 2021, 1:25pm I still don't understand how the earth's core is still molten after forming millions of years ago -Shock.png-
Maybe Jay can explain it a bit more? -Neutral.png-
There are three main sources of heat in the deep earth:
  1. heat from when the planet formed and accreted, which has not yet been lost;
  2. frictional heating, caused by denser core material sinking to the centre of the planet; and
  3. heat from the decay of radioactive elements.
It takes a rather long time for heat to move out of the earth. This occurs through both "convective" transport of heat within the earth's liquid outer core and solid mantle and slower "conductive" transport of heat through nonconvecting boundary layers, such as the earth's plates at the surface. As a result, much of the planet's primordial heat, from when the earth first accreted and developed its core, has been retained.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... hs-core-so

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Keyolder
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Apr 2021 03 21:01

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

thecaretaker wrote: Sat, 3rd Apr 2021, 5:03pm It takes a rather long time for heat to move out of the earth. This occurs through both "convective" transport of heat within the earth's liquid outer core and solid mantle and slower "conductive" transport of heat through nonconvecting boundary layers, such as the earth's plates at the surface. As a result, much of the planet's primordial heat, from when the earth first accreted and developed its core, has been retained.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... hs-core-so
I still find it amazing that even after billions of years the earths core has lost very little of its original heat leftover from the big bang -Shock.png-
I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it... -Crazy.png-
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AndyCornwall
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Apr 2021 05 10:58

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

Oh it's lost lots of its heat, but the core is well insulated by s couple of thousand miles of rock, started out a lot hotter that it is now and the earth is slowly solidifying, losing liquid core to solid core as it cools.

It's hard to realise the long timescales involved here and the core is still a mystery, the latest theories are that the core is crystalline iron enabling it to remain solid at the silly temperatures that exist there.
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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 12 17:50

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

A better view... still going.



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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 15 18:06

Re: Live from Geldingadalir volcano, Iceland

The cameras are no more. The volcano has turned violent and burnt the cameras filming it live to youtube. You wanna see this report. -Forgive.png-




UPDATE: The lava is now around 10 million cubic metres in total with 5 cubic metres flowing out of those vents every second. The Volcano Area Has Changed Dramatically


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