Tumbling new EV prices

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Vera
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Apr 2021 07 17:24

Re: Tumbling new EV prices

thecaretaker wrote: Wed, 7th Apr 2021, 4:27pm I had a Leyland mini 850cc (Pageant Blue). I needed to replace the lower radiator hose. It was near impossible to get a spanner down between the side facing radiator and the body to the bottom hose bolt. Many folk cut a hole in the side (air fins behind the wheel) to get better access. But I did persevere and finally managed it somehow. They weren't the easiest car to work on, but parts were off the shelf at most dealers and very cheap in comparison to other cars. I loved my mini.

You'd only spend that kind of money to electrify one if the chassis and bodywork were in tip tip condition. The Leyland Mini's were prone to rust and used thinner metal than the original. The older models with external door hinges were much more solid. When I had mine in the early 80's, you only saw older versions or younger Leyland models on the road. There was a gap between the old version and the Leyland ones as the newer only lasted 8 years or so. The original mini's went on for years.

My favourite was the Mini Hornet with a boot. Lovely walnut dash. I bought a kit and added the Walnut dash and door trims to my 850cc Mini. Looking back now, I spent far too much money on that Mini. I fully carpeted it, added radios and clocks etc. A misguided youth as when you sold it, you never really got your money back despite it looking like a miniature Rolls Royce. But it was my first car and I loved it (and remember it to this day).

For those who didn't know what the Mini Elf or Hornet looked like (note external door hinges and no, the radiator wasn't behind that imposing front grill as far as I recall - it was on the right hand side of the transverse engine same as other mini's)


hornet.png
It's stories like yours that make the Mini what it is today, almost everyone that had one or drove one remembers the joy of a small little car that was cheap to run and repair.
That bottom hose is one of many jobs on a mini that was far easier to do once the engine unit was out. Once practiced it would take less than an hour to remove the engine and the same to put it back.
I had an Autograss mini with a simplified wiring loom and I could remove that in 15mins with two pairs of hands and a block and chain.

In terms of rust issues you are correct the cars built in the 1970's don't do so well there was a period after that where it improved but by the rover years in the 1990's the poor quality metal and poor painting of none shiny bits of the car make those a bit of a nightmare to repair.

You are correct the Wolsely Hornet had the standard mini engine configuration with the radiator mounted on the right side with the fan mounted to the water pump blowing through into the nearside wing area.
i'm going to need a bigger bucket! -JawDropped.png-
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AndyCornwall
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Apr 2021 08 09:24

Re: Tumbling new EV prices

I wonder how many conversions do away with a gearbox and just have what amounts to a final drive.
The mini looks harder than most because of its engine on gearbox setup, but I guess an adaptor is put on top and the gearbox locked in a suitable gear?

Because electric motors have a flat torque curve from the start multiple gears seem unecessary, altho I would have thought you could get better performance with one.
Doesn't seem like an avenue manufacturers are going down tho.
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Keyolder
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Apr 2021 08 15:33

Re: Tumbling new EV prices

AndyCornwall wrote: Thu, 8th Apr 2021, 9:24am Because electric motors have a flat torque curve from the start multiple gears seem unecessary, altho I would have thought you could get better performance with one.
Doesn't seem like an avenue manufacturers are going down tho.
The Porsche Taycan Turbo uses a 2-speed transmission/final drive rear axle, and some electric conversions do include the original gearbox and clutch.
The final drive in most EV’s is usually equivalent to third gear in a normal car, as electric motors can also run in reverse just imagine the fun you could have in reverse doing J-turns in a converted manual internal combustion car.
Unless electronically limited it could be capable of around 80 mph in reverse… -Scared.png-
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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 08 16:30

Re: Tumbling new EV prices

Keyolder wrote: Thu, 8th Apr 2021, 3:33pm
Unless electronically limited it could be capable of around 80 mph in reverse… -Scared.png-
Just like Steam Trains. They can go just as fast in reverse as they can forward.

I must try it in my e-Niro sometime. Will have to find somewhere suitable. M25 maybe -Big grin.png-

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thecaretaker
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Apr 2021 08 16:34

Re: Tumbling new EV prices

Back to the original subject...

Nissan has reduced the price of the Leaf on all the range...
  • Acenta £25,995 (<£1,350)
  • N-Connecta £27,995 (<£650)
  • LEAF 10 £28,670 (<£650)
  • Tekna £29,995 (<£665)
  • E+ N-Connecta £30,445 (<£5,250)
  • E+ Tekna £32,445 (<£5,265)
Only the E+ is above the governments £30k cut off for the grant.

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